DEUTSCHES LEBENSMITTELBUCH PDF

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Please contact customerservices lexology. As part of governmental effort to curb the increase of diabetes and obesity and to meet consumer demand for healthier diets, food and drink producers across the globe are facing pressure to reduce the sugar content of their products. One of the measures being introduced by an increasing number of governments is a "sugar tax", targeting high-sugar soft drinks, in an effort to reduce sugar intake among consumers and increase revenues from tax.

Sugary beverages are highly regulated worldwide: From tax to labelling regulations. As a result of several sugar taxes in the EU, such as the UK's "Soft Drinks Industry Levy", soft drinks manufacturers, including those that produce lemonade, were incentivized to reconsider the sugar content of their product formulas.

A similar tax in Ireland has motivated large carbonated drinks suppliers, such as Britvic, to consider reformulating their product to avoid higher taxation. Malaysia has jumped on the "sugar tax" bandwagon by introducing an excise duty on sugar-sweetened beverages, which will be effective from 1 April Currently, there is no minimum sugar content nor other requirements in relation to the use of the term "lemonade" in the Food Regulations.

In Singapore, the Food Regulations ultimately seek to draw a distinction between the labelling of drinks that contain real juice from fruit, and drinks that do not, rather than distinguish between the labelling of drinks with varying sugar content. Regulation 2 of the Food Regulations requires any non-alcoholic drink which incorporates the name of a fruit, vegetable or flower in its name — such as LEMON — and wishes to be labelled with the suffix "-ade" without actually using the juice of that fruit in its composition, to specify "[name of fruit, vegetable or flower] flavored drink" or "imitation [name of fruit, vegetable or flower] drink".

In Switzerland, there are rather strict requirements for fruit juices, but the Ordinance on Beverages does not stipulate any additional requirements regarding the ingredients of soft drinks with or without fruit juice in their composition.

Therefore, Swiss lemonade is not obliged to contain any sugar or sugar substitutes to be called "lemonade". This threshold is set by the German Food Book [1] Deutsches Lebensmittelbuch , and specifically, the Guidelines for Soft Drinks, and addresses their manufacture, composition and properties, which aim to protect consumers from misleading information by providing clarity and accuracy about products.

According to the CPO, LemonAid must either be re-named, so it is no longer called a "lemonade", or its sugar content must be increased.

So will LemonAid — and all other low-sugar soft drinks manufacturers — have to sell their beverages under different names in Germany, or adapt the recipe for the German market? The manufacturer rejected the claims, pointing out that the lemonade has been on the market since and that its product does not mislead the consumer. As Germany seems to be a lone rider in that regard, the CPO indicated that they would work towards reaching an amicable solution.

So it seems that a German "sugar-gate" can be avoided. If you would like to learn how Lexology can drive your content marketing strategy forward, please email enquiries lexology. The service succeeds in reducing that torrent to manageable gulps of high value analyses addressing topics of immediacy. Back Forward. Share Facebook Twitter Linked In. Follow Please login to follow content. Register now for your free, tailored, daily legal newsfeed service.

Baker McKenzie. Germany February 4 Sugary beverages are highly regulated worldwide: From tax to labelling regulations As a result of several sugar taxes in the EU, such as the UK's "Soft Drinks Industry Levy", soft drinks manufacturers, including those that produce lemonade, were incentivized to reconsider the sugar content of their product formulas.

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GIGAVUE MP PDF

Soft Drink and Lemonade Sugar Content: A "Weighty" Difference, At least in Germany!

Please contact customerservices lexology. As part of governmental effort to curb the increase of diabetes and obesity and to meet consumer demand for healthier diets, food and drink producers across the globe are facing pressure to reduce the sugar content of their products. One of the measures being introduced by an increasing number of governments is a "sugar tax", targeting high-sugar soft drinks, in an effort to reduce sugar intake among consumers and increase revenues from tax. Sugary beverages are highly regulated worldwide: From tax to labelling regulations.

FAAC 401MPS PDF

Bundesministerium für Ernährung und Landwirtschaft

The quality of food is an excellent topic for heated debates. The regularly updated German Food Code Deutsches Lebensmittelbuch has provided guidance to consumers and producers for decades. The Internet portal of the German Food Code Commission contains information on what consumers may expect from food. What ingredients go into a turkey kebab? What should the percentage of whole grain be in wholegrain bread? Can the tail fin be left on rollmop herrings?

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