ARTURO PEREZ REVERTE LA REINA DEL SUR PDF

For me, all of the details get in the way. I often felt as though I were reading a history textbook, when I wanted to be watching an action movie inside my head. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions.

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For me, all of the details get in the way. I often felt as though I were reading a history textbook, when I wanted to be watching an action movie inside my head. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Andrew Hurley translator.

Guero Davila is a pilot engaged in drug-smuggling for the local cartels. Teresa Mendoza is his girlfriend, a typical narco's morra-- quiet, doting, submissive. But then Guero's caught playing both sides, and in Sinaloa, that means death. Teresa finds herself alone, terrified, friendless and running to save her life, carrying nothing but a gym bag containing a pistol and a Guero Davila is a pilot engaged in drug-smuggling for the local cartels. Teresa finds herself alone, terrified, friendless and running to save her life, carrying nothing but a gym bag containing a pistol and a notebook that she has been forbidden to read.

Forced to leave Mexico, she flees to the Spanish city of Melilla, where she meets Santiago Fisterra, a Galician involved in trafficking hashish across the Strait of Gibraltar.

When Santiago's partner is captured, it is Teresa who steps in to take his place. Now Teresa has plunged into the dark and ugly world that once claimed Guero's life-- and she's about to get in deeper Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published by Picador first published More Details Original Title.

Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Queen of the South , please sign up. Is this book fiction or nonfiction? Barbara It is fiction, but it strings together a lot of character and situations from non-fiction.

Why did Teresa Mendoza decide to come back to Sinaloa? James Partially but the net was closing around her in Spain. See all 4 questions about The Queen of the South…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Queen of the South. Aug 20, Kelly rated it liked it Shelves: fiction , goth-goth-baby , 20th-century-postwar-to-late , owned , shes-quite-an-original-my-dear.

There are three books to be found within this book, three major storylines to follow. One is mostly well done, one is middling, but has issues, one is rather ridiculous, occasionally mildly offensive, and out of place.

The first, which I found mostly well done, is Perez-Reverte's homage to the high adventure stories of the 19th century, specificially his modern update of The Count of Monte Cristo. The Count is remade into a Mexican woman of the 21st century, who is tied to the Mexican drug carte There are three books to be found within this book, three major storylines to follow. The Count is remade into a Mexican woman of the 21st century, who is tied to the Mexican drug cartels through her drug running pilot boyfriend.

She is set on the run for a crime she did not commit, and runs off to Spain, and we watch the relative naif follow the torturous path of Dantes, a path that is perhaps even more painful than his. It is a clever idea to cast the Count as a woman- it adds to the tale many obstacles and possibilities of obstacles that Edmund Dantes never had to face, and it complicates the progression of our main character to the triumphant protaganist that we all know is coming from the layout of the plot.

I found the adventure story aspect of the novel all excellently done- there are several high speed boat chases that have the pages turning at a velocity to match the engines of the boats, there are unexpected shoot outs, there are moments with only one way out, gambles that hold the fate the characters in the palm of their hand to heart pounding effect. Perez-Reverte has always been able to swashbuckle his way into my affections, and this piece was no exception.

And this is a rather annoying however- I do wish that he hadn't felt the need to constantly shove in our faces the fact that this was a version of The Count of Monte Cristo. He had characters refer to each other as their counterparts in the book. You couldn't trust us to figure that one out, Arturo? Come on, man. I promise you, we're smart enough for that. The book becomes a major motif, and a jumping off point for the characters to make fun of each other for how much they are into it and how delusional that is.

It was just a little too self-involved for me. It reads more like fan-fiction sometimes. It's lovely to see how giddy he is about Dumas' tale, and its life changing powers, but I wish he would just let us see it for ourselves rather than constantly insisting upon the truth of it and insisting that his characters enact his own fascination with it.

It feels artificial, and sometimes a bit insulting. We get it. I promise. The second story contained within the book and I should probably say that there are spoilers from here on out is the story of the transformation of a woman. Teresa begins the book a girl totally dependent upon the whims of others- especially her "narco," boyfriend, Guero. She sits at home and waits for him, takes care of him, puts him first in every way. She doesn't know much about his business, and she doesn't ask.

When she is forced to go on the run after Guero is killed by his bosses for committing several indiscretions, she has to slowly learn how to become independent. Perez-Reverte is truly fascinated by the thought of a truly independent woman, you can tell. I've said time and again that he has a dark lady obsession- this book is entirely about that, in fact though at least we get to see the world from her perspective, and see why she is mysterious , but I think this is really what the obsession is.

He worships the very idea of it, though he doesn't seem to quite believe that it can be true, or that women can completely seperate from what he clearly believes are their natural womanly urges, which turned out to be a problem.

While she was learning to rely on herself, use her natural gifts she's gifted with a head for numbers, for instance and her intelligence and rely on and trust no one, Perez-Reverte feels the need to frame it in terms of gender.

By the end of the novel, she has assumed the role of her narco boyfriend in her relationship with everyone she knows, and coldly addresses her business partner who is in love with her as a "nagging wife," who believes "her husband works too much and neglects her. He frequently has Teresa feel things, "in her womb," when he wants to emphasize that it is a real feeling.

No, for reals. However, that all said, I did like the attempt at rendering a woman who truly does not need anyone, and even when betrayed by people she trusts, does not descend into a weeping mess, but handles the situation. She gets herself out of the last, tense corners of the novel without one single man left to help her in any way. I really, really appreciated that. So, if the development was uneven and somewhat unbelievable, I at least was with him on his goal, and the last pages of her development.

The third thing going on here, that was absolutely ridiculous, is Perez-Reverte's various personal opinions and feelings being put on display. I found it rather embarrassing, pedantic, and offensive, by turns. First of all, let's just note that there's a lot of weird attitudes towards ethnicity in this book. Yes, part of it is that he's writing about a world where people aren't exactly PC, but some of it comes from the omniscient narrator point of view part of the story is told by a journalist trying to write a book about Teresa, part is told from her point of view.

There's a really weird, somewhat twisted relationship with Mexico in the book. Perez-Reverte seems to be arguing for the fact that Spaniards shouldn't find their culture "superior" to Mexico in any way because Spain has just as many problems which I didn't even know was a comparison that happened but okay. And yet, at the same time, he seems to be weirdly fetishizing, in a conflicted 19th century colonialist way, the Mexican ethnicity. At many points during the book characters tell Teresa that she looks best with her hair pulled back tightly and parted down the middle, "in the style of a Mexican peasant.

And yet, she ends up being dressed up makeover style in a modern, more discreet European way. Everyone, including Teresa, looks down on the "garish" way that Mexican drug cartel people dress and live The other Mexican character who is held up as an example refuses to let go of his "garish" ways, and listens to his "corridos" songs about drug cartels loudly and often. They are quoted frequently throughout the novel, seemingly as examples of poetry. It's this weird mixture of idealization and looking down his nose that I can't quite figure out.

It just popped up uncomfortably often and I didn't quite get why that was there. Anyway, this has likely gone on for long enough, but the point is- its a lovely adventure novel, and a good "coming of age," tale in its way, but not without a good deal of complication. This is my least favorite of his books, though it is still not bad or anything. Just not representative of what he is capable of.

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La Reina del Sur

USA sat down with the internationally bestselling author and learned more about his inspiration for Teresa Mendoza , his views on the strengths of women, the role of luck in our lives, and the challenges of adapting Queen of the South into English. And sometimes I get involved in specific aspects where my intervention is requested. In this case, I was not involved. All women are in enemy territory for centuries, but in this case, this is particularly accentuated because the drug-dealing world is a very machista hostile environment. Here, the survival of a woman in enemy territory is even more spectacular.

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La Reina del Sur lit. The first season is produced by the American television network Telemundo in conjunction with the Antena 3 network and RTI Producciones , while season 2 is co-produced by Telemundo Global Studios and Netflix. It premiered on 28 February The series depicts the rise of Teresa Mendoza Kate del Castillo , a young woman from Mexico who becomes the most powerful drug trafficker in southern Spain. The series has been renewed for a second season that premiered on 22 April It is the chronicle of the rise to power of a Mexican woman within the world of international drug trafficking. Teresa Mendoza begins her adventure as a humble young woman in love with a pilot employed by the Mexican cartels.

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La Reina del Sur / The Queen of the South

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